Browsing Posts published in November, 2010

  ADAM JEFF KENNY MATT MIKE
NE @ DET NE DET NE NE NE
NO @ DAL DAL NO DAL NO NO
CIN @ NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ
GB @ ATL ATL ATL ATL ATL GB
PIT @ BUF PUT PIT PIT PIT PIT
CAR @ CLE CLE CLE CLE CLE CLE
TEN @ HOU HOU HOU HOU HOU HOU
JAX @ NYG NYG NYG NYG NYG NYG
MIN @ WSH WSH WSH WSH MIN WSH
MIA @ OAK OAK OAK OAK OAK OAK
KC @ SEA SEA KC SEA SEA SEA
TB @ BAL BAL BAL BAL BAL BAL
PHI @ CHI PHI CHI CHI PHI PHI
STL @ DEN DEN STL DEN STL DEN
SD @ IND IND IND IND IND SD
SF @ ARI ARI SF SF ARI SF
           
LOCK CLE PIT PIT NYJ PIT
UPSET DEN DET DAL MIN SD
POINTS 92 97 102 100 102

Let’s just get crazy for a minute.

By now, you’ve heard that the Derek Jeter-New York Yankee contract negotiations have hit a bump in the road. Sources say that the two sides are ‘miles apart‘. The Yankees seem set on their initial offer of three years, $45 million. Jeter and agent Casey Close apparently want 5-6 years at $20 million per season. Clearly the two sides seem firmly set on their demands and really are miles apart.

Let’s assume that the Yankees and Derek Jeter cannot find middle ground. The Yankees are too prideful to offer a 36-year-old shortstop who hit .270 last season, more than $15 million per season. Jeter and Close recognize Jeter’s importance to the Yankee franchise off the diamond. Jeter feels disrespected and truly tests the free agent waters.

Here come the Red Sox.

The ultimate victory. The ultimate theft. ‘The Curse of Jeter’

The team has made it clear that they are willing to move current shortstop, Marco Scutaro. Scutaro is in the final year of his contract and makes a very manageable $5 million. If the possibility of pulling Jeter away from the Yankee becomes real, expect the Red Sox to at least check in on the current Yankee captain. Would Jeter possibility stick it to the Yankees if the Red Sox offered him a two year, $30 million deal? Think about how the rivalry would be renewed. Think about the tension associated with Jeter returning to New York in a Boston uniform.

I won’t waste anymore of your time because this situation has about 1% chance of happening. It’s definitely interesting to think about, but the Yankees and Jeter will eventually get this thing done.

Fourth quarter. Fourth-and-one. Fifty-yard touchdown run.

And it seemed like it could have been over way before then.

For the second week in a row, Big Blue loses to a division rival. This time the Giants fall to the Eagles, 27-17.
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It was confirmed Sunday afternoon that Terry Collins has been named manager of the New York Mets. SNY will broadcast a press conference Tuesday at 11 AM. No further plans for Backman, Hale, and Melvin have been discussed as of yet.

northjersey.com

As I expressed a few days ago, I expected the decision would ultimately be between Collins and Melvin, but I was hoping for the latter. Given the news, however, I wish Collins the best of luck and hope that he can turn this mess around.

I’ve heard rumors that Backman will be offered a managing role at either St. Lucie or Binghamton, which would make me very happy.

  ADAM JEFF KENNY MATT MIKE
BAL @ CAR BAL BAL BAL BAL BAL
BUF @ CIN CIN BUF BUF CIN BUF
DET @ DAL DAL DAL DAL DAL DAL
CLE @ JAX JAX JAX CLE JAX CLE
ARI @ KC KC KC KC KC KC
GB @ MIN GB GB MIN MIN GB
HOU @ NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ NYJ
OAK @ PIT PIT PIT OAK PIT OAK
WSH @ TEN TEN TEN TEN TEN TEN
SEA @ NO NO NO NO NO NO
TB @ SF TB TB TB SF TB
ATL @ STL STL ATL ATL STL STL
IND @ NE NE NE NE NE NE
NYG @ PHI PHI NYG NYG PHI PHI
DEN @ SD SD SD SD SD SD
           
LOCK BAL BAL BAL NO BAL
UPSET STL BUF OAK SF STL
POINTS 78 81 91 88 90

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, the New York Mets are inching their way towards hiring a manager. Mets GM Sandy Alderson has listed Terry Collins, Wally Backman, Chip Hale, and Bob Melvin as the final four candidates to decide between. They have all received second interviews this week, in which I expect involved more in-depth questions on how to bring the team to the playoffs. All candidates either have a history with the Mets organization or past managerial experience. With Alderson making his final decision by the beginning of next week, which of these four would be the best choice?

Getty Images

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But don’t turn off the lights just yet…

Getty Images


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If anyone was hoping for a quick resolution to Derek Jeter’s contract situation, think again. As the eighteenth day of the off-season begins, the Yankees and their captain remain ‘miles apart’ in terms of a new contract. As Joel Sherman reported yesterday, the Yankees are approaching negotiations with Jeter in a civil, business-type manner. The team is willing to pay Jeter more money per season for this contract, but will not go beyond three-years. Reportedly, Jeter is asking for a five or six year deal at his past rate (roughly $19 per season).

Outside of Jeter’s massive fan support, World Series rings, and unquestionable desire to win, sits the 800 pound gorilla in the room. Jeter’s 2010 season was arguably his worst season to date. Specifically, his batting average fell by 64 points and at times, he looked painfully slow playing shortstop. Jeter did take home another Gold Glove, but the Yankees know The Captain’s days are numbered.

Jeter’s glaringly poor 2010 season does hinder him a bit with negotiations, but a few unquestionable points stand out. Jeter is only 74 hits away from becoming the first Yankee ever to collect 3,000 hits. His popularity and fan appeal is unmatched in New York City. Jeter embodies everything that a Yankee should be:

A true gentleman who has the selfless desire and passion to help his team win.

Regardless of the parties involved, baseball contracts need to be smart decisions for both the player and team. The Yankees know they have to be smart with Jeter. Upsetting the captain could be a devastating PR move, but they also don’t want to get locked into an ugly five or six year contract with a declining shortstop who will need to move over to third base in the near future.

In the end, the Yankees and Jeter will agree to a new contract. However, we may end up ringing in 2011 before the Yankees ink up Mr. November.

Ah, the World Series is a distant memory. The individual awards are starting to roll in and the Hot Stove is finally starting to heat up. We already know that the Yankees are going to resign Mariano Rivera and Derek Jeter. Andy Pettitte has the option of returning for 2011 and the Yankees are hotly on Cliff Lee’s trail. Outside of those players, rumors began swirling yesterday that the Yankees contacting the Diamondbacks about 23-year-old phenomenon right fielder, Justin Upton. Upton, who is entering his fourth year as a starter, is two years removed from an impressive 20/20 season where he hit .300. Can we reasonably expect the Yankees to pursue the 2005 #1 pick or is this just simply a case of the Yankees completing their necessary due diligence on one of the game’s more promising young talents?

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As unfortunate as it sounds, 2010 for Jorge Posada, Yankee “catcher”, was as mediocre as we all thought it would be. Let’s take a look back at his season, and see how he fits in with the Yankees in 2011.

Sad face for a below-average year - AP

Way back when on April 1st, columnist Matt Vereb had the following projection for Jorge Posada in 2010:

117 Games, .275 BA, 24 HRs, 90 RBIs

Unfortunately, all but one those numbers fell short. He played 120 games and batted .248 while hitting 18 home runs and knocking in 57 runs. Those numbers are all obviously lower than the career average of the five-time All-Star. But at this point, what can you expect from a depreciating catcher at the ripe-old age of 39? For the upcoming season, the Yankees plan on using Jorge as a designated hitter. At first, this seems like a great move to keep Jorge healthy, who struggled to stay healthy. However, check out these splits between Jorge at catcher and at DH.

Catcher: 270 AB, .256/.370/.474, 13 HR, 42 RBI, 61 K, 45 BB
DH/PH: 111 AB, .234/.348/.420, 5 HR, 15 RBI, 37 K, 14 BB

As you can see, Jorge plays much better when he is in fact in the game the entire time as a catcher, not sitting on his hands waiting to be called in by Joe Girardi or getting an at-bat every three innings as a designated hitter. But at this point, with one year left on his deal, Joe really has no other options. When Posada plays behind the plate every day, he will get hurt. It’s almost impossible for him not to at that age.

Next year, I believe the Yankees will employ a three-headed monster at catcher, between Posada, Francisco Cervelli, and super soon-to-be rookie Jesus Montero. At best, Jorge can catch three out of every five games. Against lefties, he will almost certainly be the DH so one of the two young right-handed catchers can get some favorable at bats.

What do you think the Yankees should do with Jorge next year? Is there any chance he gets re-upped for 2011 as a full-time DH?